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A community resiliency discussion in 2019

Tuesday, 20 November 2018 by

A community resiliency discussion on disaster preparedness

Come to learn about the new emergency management program at Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation and have your questions answered with TDN Emergency Manager Kymmie Scott and Emergency Services Coordinator Tessa LaFazio.

FOOD AND RAFFLE PRIZES
GUEST SPEAKER FROM FEMA WILL SPEAK ON COMMUNITY PREPAREDNESS

Dee‐dvn‐la: Tuesday, January 29th, 2019

Ghvt‐ti‐lh: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m

Dvt‐la: Xaa‐wan’‐k’wvt Hall Community Center 101 North Indian Ct. Smith River, California

Ghaa~-yalh-te haa~? (are you going to come)

All members of the public are welcome (tribal or non-tribal) who reside in or near TDN For more information call 707-487-9255 ext. 1144

  • CANCELED November 27th, 2018
  • CANCELED December 25th, 2018
  • January 29th, 2019
  • February 26th, 2019
  • March 26th, 2019

 

Devon O’Reilley was honored at the 49th annual National Tribal Judicial and Court Personnel Conference

In October 2018, Tribal Citizen Devon O’Reilley was honored at the 49th

annual National Tribal Judicial and Court Personnel Conference for her dedication, and success in the growth of the Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation Tribal Court. The Tribal Court has grown its capacity, both in funding and staffing since Devon took on the role of Tribal Court Administrator in 2016. The President of the National American Indian Court Judges Association, Judge Richard Blake nominated Devon and shares the following excerpt from his nomination letter:

I strongly believe that Devon does not expect to be honored for her job duties. However, I strongly believe that in addition to making her way up from Court Clerk to Court Administrator and hopefully in the future Is that Devon O’Reilly will be the 1st tribal member Chief Judge, as I have the strong opinion that she possesses the qualities of a fine Judge. It this type of upward mobility and hard work that needs to be acknowledged and supported and providing an opportunity for tribal members to assume critical positions and maintaining their custom and tradition.

As a strong Tolowa woman, Devon is not only a great tribal member, a dedicated court employee, a great advocate and very strong role model to not only her four daughters but all young women in her tribe. An advocate for tribal member children and elders, Devon clearly maintains that population as very important. Her desire to develop a youth wellness court resulted in the research for funding.

About the association: the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) is comprised of tribal justice personnel & others devoted to supporting and strengthening tribal justice systems through education, information sharing, and advocacy. NAICJA is a non-profit corporation established in 1969 as a corporation in the state of Delaware following the enactment of the federal Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968. The Act required tribes to follow certain requirements similar to those in the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. Tribal courts are the forums where those rights are enforced. NAICJA’s mission is to strengthen and enhance tribal justice systems.

The President of the National American Indian Court Judges Association, Judge Richard Blake nominated Devon

The President of the National American Indian Court Judges Association, Judge Richard Blake nominated Devon

On the evening of October 5th Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation Staff, TDN citizens and Chairwoman, Denise Richards-Padgette welcomed the Pacific Northwest Spirit Runners as they arrived from their recent stretch from Cow Creek territory (Roseburg, Oregon area). The Spirit Runners began running on September 1st at the U.S. Canada border in Washington and concluded October 8 (Indigenous Peoples Day) on Alcatraz Island to coincide with the Annual Sunrise Ceremony. When they arrived they still had a few weeks left and about 330 miles left to run.

They arrived with the purpose to reunite Indigenous Nations of the Pacific North West, Restore collaborative working relationships of ALL indigenous Nations of the Pacific Northwest & resolve the issues and concerns that have long plagued Indigenous Nations of the Pacific North West.

On Saturday morning tribal citizens and staff greeted runners with a breakfast and began a walk around the reservation to the mouth of the Smith River. Blessings and prayers sent the runners off as they began their next stretch from Smith River to Klamath, California. A few runners joined in with the Spirit Runners to Klamath including Ridge McLennan who represented the Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation.

Shu’ shaa nin-la to everyone who came out to welcome the runners and send their prayers. They all made it to Alcatraz for the sunrise ceremony.

Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation Staff, TDN citizens and Chairwoman, Denise Richards-Padgette welcomed the Pacific Northwest Spirit Runners as they arrived from their recent stretch from Cow Creek territory (Roseburg, Oregon area).

Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation Staff, TDN citizens, and Chairwoman, Denise Richards-Padgette welcomed the Pacific Northwest Spirit Runners as they arrived from their recent stretch from Cow Creek territory (Roseburg, Oregon area).

For Immediate Release
October 26, 2018
Fresno, CA—On Wednesday, October 17, 2018, the California Fish and Game Commission adopted a long-negotiated vision statement on co-management. For almost a decade, the topic of co-management has been discussed and debated by California tribes and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (Department) as a result of the Marine Life Protection Act’s unintended impacts to California Tribes.

In 2016, co-management gained considerably more attention after Assemblymember Wood,
working with the Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation, introduced Assembly Bill 1792, an act to amend Section
332 of the Fish and Game Code, relating to hunting. Although the bill was not successful in the
Assembly, the attention the bill received prompted further action on co-management within the
Tribal Committee of the California Fish & Game Commission.

The long-standing goal of tribes has been to receive the assurance that tribal governments are
afforded parity and recognition as the original and inherent stewards in the management of natural
and cultural resources. With that goal in mind, the Tribal Committee of the Commission has worked
closely with Tribes the last couple of years on developing a vision statement that would encompass
that history and responsibility of California’s tribes. The Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation has spearheaded and
advanced the co-management vision statement initiative throughout numerous versions of the
vision statement. After three years of negotiation, the following language was presented to the
Commission:

The vision of Tribes, the California Fish and Game Commission, and the California Department of Fish
and Wildlife is to engage in a collaborative effort between sovereigns to jointly achieve and implement
mutually agreed upon and compatible governance and management objectives to ensure the health
and sustainable use of fish and wildlife.

Commissioner Hostler-Carmesin made the motion to adopt the vision statement, and in her motion
stated, “I make this motion with thankfulness and enthusiasm”. The co-management vision statement was adopted in full support of the Commission, Department and over 35 Tribes who submitted letters of support. This milestone for co-management is one to be celebrated and the Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation is looking forward to continuing to work with the Tribal Committee and the Department to develop and frame co-management within the State of California.

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